Tag Archive | ed tech

The LSU Top 5 #58

This is the 58th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) How Academia Resembles a Drug Gang – Alexandre Afonso The title stands alone on this one! Link Pets in the academic workplace – Times Higher Education If the purpose of […]

The LSU Top 5 #57

This is the 57th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Don’t Give Up on the Lecture – The Atlantic It’s difficult to go against the grain, especially when you’re labelled as out of touch and even arrogant or undemocratic […]

The LSU Top 5 #56

This is the 56th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) The King of MOOCs Abdicates the Throne – Slate It seems the hype over massive open online courses is being tempered. Two years ago, he was predicting that MOOCs […]

The LSU Top 5 #54

This is the 54th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet.

(Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)

Are You Competent? Prove It: Degrees Based on What You Can Do, Not How Long You WentNY Times

This article looks at a new (renewed?) push for competency- rather than time-based degrees. That is, instead of requiring students to attend class for a semester before taking a test, students can instead learn at their own pace and, when they’re ready, demonstrate that have mastered the required outcomes/competencies.

The Lumina Foundation has been one of the champions of the approach. Jamie P. Merisotis, president and chief executive, says the rationale is not just lower cost but better education. “The time-centered system says if you take the coursework, get passing grades and meet our academic standards, you get the degree,” he said. “Competency is a student-centered, learning-outcome-based model. Where you get the education is secondary to what you know and are able to do.”

Others are less in favour of the changes:

“It’s a red flag to me, the idea that this is going to be more personalized, more flexible, more accountable to the consumer,” [Amy E. Slaton, a professor of history at Drexel University,] says. “If you are from a lower socioeconomic status, you have this new option that appears to cost less than a traditional bachelor’s degree, but it’s not the same product. I see it as a really diminished higher education experience for less money, and yet disguised as this notion of greater access.”

Still room for learning skills, then!

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South Korea’s education system: The great decompression – The Economist

South Korean students dream of being recruited by one of the few big firms, called chaebol, that drive their country’s economic development. With competition so intense, preparation is pushed back even into early childhood education. There are high costs for this phenomenon, such as great psychological strain on the youngsters and a low birth rate due to the expense of education. A few solutions are suggested in the article.  

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Vietnam levies cash fine on exam cheatersTuoi Tre News

The Vietnamese government has just issued a decree to allow for fines of up to 20 million VND for breaking education rules, such as cheating, sitting exams for others, abusing students or hiring under-qualified teachers. 

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When College Students Have an Audience, Does Their Writing Improve?Ed Tech Magazine

This article looks at how giving students an audience – a real one, not a hypothetical one – can improve their writing and learning. The author interviews an English professor on what has and hasn’t worked for her in finding this audience for her students.

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Educators doubt int’l joint programs using Vietnamese translationTuoi Tre News

Educators warned students about the quality of international joint masters and doctoral programmes because of their easy entrance requirements – both for students’ academic and English backgrounds. Even non-English speaking students can gain admission to such programs offered through partnerships between Vietnamese and foreign universities, with students allowed to hire translators and complete thesis defences in Vietnamese.

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Bonus #6!

7 Awkward Places You Could Be Meeting With Your Professor This SemesterBuzzfeed

You like gifs, don’t you? Because all the answers are animated.

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We love hearing your thoughts on these articles, so feel free to comment below!

 

 

The LSU Top 5 #48

This is the 48th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Colleges’ Role Shouldn’t End at Graduation – The Chronicle of Higher Education With the transition from university to the workforce longer and often more complex […]

The LSU Top 5 #41

This is the 41st of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) College student loses lawsuit over lusty writings – AP Not many would defend a teacher professing their attraction to a student, but what about when […]

The LSU Top 5 #30

This is the 30th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet.

(Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)

 The Slowest Distance Between Two PointsThis American Life

At the age of 23, Andrew Forsthoefel fails in keeping his job and is left without a job or a plan. He decides to walk across the U.S. and learns about learning in life. This podcast is his story and features interviews of people from all walks of life giving the advice they would tell the 23-year-old version of themselves. The advice here is likely to apply to university students as well, particularly when they’re not sure where they’re headed and whether they should keep going.

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Are university lectures doomed?The Guardian

In this article, two academics (and lecturers!) debate the value of the lecture. Does learning require “students participate, interrupt, ask questions, disagree, [and] talk back” – best done somewhere other than the lecture theatre – or do lectures provide “50 minutes of pithy introduction from someone who has sorted the wheat from the chaff on the students’ behalf,” putting students “in a position to sit in class and have an informed discussion”?

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Rita Pierson: Every kid needs a championTED

A 40 year veteran teacher talks about building connections with students and keeping it all in perspective (and changing it when need be!) in this inspiring TED talk. Although it’s about school kids, these aspects of learning are the same at all levels.

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Autonomy needed for Vietnam to have world-class universitiesTuoi Tre

A retired French astrophysicist who taught in Vietnam for more than ten years has said that autonomy is prerequisite for Vietnam universities if they are to become world-class. Meanwhile, the Vietnamese government has been running a national project to upgrade its higher education system, including building partnerships with foreign governments such as Russia, Germany, France, the US and Japan. In the case of the Russian project to establish a technology university here, curriculum, books and lecturers will come from Russia.

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Some Papers Are Uploaded to Bangalore to Be GradedThe Chronicle of Higher Education

Some US universities are outsourcing grading and feedback on student papers. The graders, mainly from India, Malaysia and Singapore and all holding master’s degrees, provide a level of feedback that simply wouldn’t be possible if the universities relied only on the lecturer and teaching assistants. Some, though, say that outsourced grading and feedback necessarily ignores the context of the essays:

“An outside grader has no insight into how classroom discussion may have played into what a student wrote in their paper,” says Marilyn Valentino, chair of the board of the Conference on College Composition and Communication and a veteran professor of English at Lorain County Community College. “Are they able to say, ‘Oh, I understand where that came from’ or ‘I understand why they thought that, because Mary said that in class’?”

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We love hearing your thoughts on these articles, so feel free to comment below!

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