Tag Archive | careers

The LSU Top 5 #56

This is the 56th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) The King of MOOCs Abdicates the Throne – Slate It seems the hype over massive open online courses is being tempered. Two years ago, he was predicting that MOOCs […]

The LSU Top 5 #50

We’re 50 weeks old!

(Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)

Death of an adjunctThe Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

The death of an 83 year old adjunct French professor in poverty provides a cautionary tale of casualization of the university-teaching workforce.

NPR follows up (link).

Link

Why this year’s freshers are just part of a failed experimentThe Guardian

In this article, the author argues that British (and other?) governments have failed students by investing in universities as job/economic-creation bodies, while the market has not responded to the large increase in graduates with a parallel increase in suitable jobs, leaving students in debt and dead-end jobs.

Link

Grades improve when students lead learningTimes Higher Education

Putting students in the centre and letting them decide how they learn seems like a nice idea. But in an experiment at Avans University in the Netherlands, attendance rose from less than half to 96% and grades improved. A nice idea, and an effective one!

Link

Employers and Community-College Students Aren’t Sold on Online Degrees, Survey FindsThe Chronicle of Higher Education

This author of this article seems surprised that many employers and students are less satisfied with online degrees. But given how recently online education has mainstreamed, which of these is more surprising?

  • 56% of employers favoured applicants with a traditional degree; or 26% don’t care and 17% prefer online degrees?
  • 42% of students reporting less learning from online courses; or 58% saying they learned as much or more?

It will be interesting to see how these change in the next few years.

 Link

Perma.ccHarvard Law School Library

With 70% of published links in citations not linking to the original material, readers of even fairly new work must resort to a faith-based trust in the author’s reading and interpretation. Perma.cc, developed by the Harvard Law School Library in conjunction with other university law libraries, will store a frozen version of the cited material for two years or, if the citation is confirmed by a journal, in perpetuity. Still in beta, it isn’t clear if this will just be for law publications.

Link

We love hearing your thoughts on these articles, so feel free to comment below!

The LSU Top 5 #48

This is the 48th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Colleges’ Role Shouldn’t End at Graduation – The Chronicle of Higher Education With the transition from university to the workforce longer and often more complex […]

The LSU Top 5 #41

This is the 41st of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) College student loses lawsuit over lusty writings – AP Not many would defend a teacher professing their attraction to a student, but what about when […]

Managing you

By David DeBrot, LSU I started off this article with the intent of exploring the placement and relationship of management in education, until I realized that a bunch of people wouldn’t really care to read this. So, in facing this reality, I realized that while management is often seen as an ‘import’ from the business […]

The LSU Top 5 #36

This is the 36th of our weekly links to the top 5 bits and pieces we’ve found from around the internet. (Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!) Giving Employers What They Don’t Really Want – The Chronicle There is a huge mismatch between what universities think employers want (transferable knowledge) and what […]

Your turn: Is it all about jobs?

By David DeBrot, LSU My son is 7 years old and in Grade 1. His last field trip was to a local kid’s ‘edutainment’ facility entirely themed on occupations and getting them to think about what job they’d like to perform in the future. I felt frustrated – ‘Isn’t 7 a little too early to […]

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