The LSU Top 5 #54

This is the 54th of our top 5 bits and pieces about education from around the internet.

(Linking doesn’t mean we necessarily agree with these articles!)

Are You Competent? Prove It: Degrees Based on What You Can Do, Not How Long You WentNY Times

This article looks at a new (renewed?) push for competency- rather than time-based degrees. That is, instead of requiring students to attend class for a semester before taking a test, students can instead learn at their own pace and, when they’re ready, demonstrate that have mastered the required outcomes/competencies.

The Lumina Foundation has been one of the champions of the approach. Jamie P. Merisotis, president and chief executive, says the rationale is not just lower cost but better education. “The time-centered system says if you take the coursework, get passing grades and meet our academic standards, you get the degree,” he said. “Competency is a student-centered, learning-outcome-based model. Where you get the education is secondary to what you know and are able to do.”

Others are less in favour of the changes:

“It’s a red flag to me, the idea that this is going to be more personalized, more flexible, more accountable to the consumer,” [Amy E. Slaton, a professor of history at Drexel University,] says. “If you are from a lower socioeconomic status, you have this new option that appears to cost less than a traditional bachelor’s degree, but it’s not the same product. I see it as a really diminished higher education experience for less money, and yet disguised as this notion of greater access.”

Still room for learning skills, then!

Link

South Korea’s education system: The great decompression – The Economist

South Korean students dream of being recruited by one of the few big firms, called chaebol, that drive their country’s economic development. With competition so intense, preparation is pushed back even into early childhood education. There are high costs for this phenomenon, such as great psychological strain on the youngsters and a low birth rate due to the expense of education. A few solutions are suggested in the article.  

Link

Vietnam levies cash fine on exam cheatersTuoi Tre News

The Vietnamese government has just issued a decree to allow for fines of up to 20 million VND for breaking education rules, such as cheating, sitting exams for others, abusing students or hiring under-qualified teachers. 

Link 
When College Students Have an Audience, Does Their Writing Improve?Ed Tech Magazine

This article looks at how giving students an audience – a real one, not a hypothetical one – can improve their writing and learning. The author interviews an English professor on what has and hasn’t worked for her in finding this audience for her students.

Link

Educators doubt int’l joint programs using Vietnamese translationTuoi Tre News

Educators warned students about the quality of international joint masters and doctoral programmes because of their easy entrance requirements – both for students’ academic and English backgrounds. Even non-English speaking students can gain admission to such programs offered through partnerships between Vietnamese and foreign universities, with students allowed to hire translators and complete thesis defences in Vietnamese.

Link

Bonus #6!

7 Awkward Places You Could Be Meeting With Your Professor This SemesterBuzzfeed

You like gifs, don’t you? Because all the answers are animated.

Link

We love hearing your thoughts on these articles, so feel free to comment below!

 

 

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Tell us what you think

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: